Storm Damage in Fruit and Vegetable Gardens

Storm damage to fruits and vegetables can take various forms.  From broken limbs in fruit trees to hail damage on fruits and vegetables or flooding raising food safety concerns, severe weather can have significant effects for the health and productivity of the garden.  Some damage will require maintenance, while other warrants a wait-and-see approach.  Here’s a list of some common types of damage to fruits and vegetables and what you should do (or shouldn’t do) about it. Continue reading Storm Damage in Fruit and Vegetable Gardens

Pollinators and the food we eat

I wrote and published this post for the GROBigRed blog on 6/21/17.  Check out that blog for great gardening information from all of my Nebraska Extension colleagues in Omaha. Pollinators and the food we eat – GRO Big Red It has been well-established and well-discussed that pollinators are responsible for the production (and reproduction) of about 35 percent of the crops that we grow for … Continue reading Pollinators and the food we eat

Pickin’ up a pawpaw, put it in the garden

Pawpaws are a native fruit that grows throughout the woods in the eastern U.S. The scientific name (Asimina triloba) comes from the Native American term assimin and Latin for three referencing the three petals on the brown, nondescript flowers of the tree that have a slight rotten smell to attract pollinating flies. Continue reading Pickin’ up a pawpaw, put it in the garden

Growing the biggest and best in the garden

So it goes to reason that letting plants grow to their biggest and best is a no-brainer. Often, however, the key to the nicest plants, the showiest flowers, or the biggest vegetables is all in knowing what to remove from the plant and when.Take, for example, flowers. If I have a dahlia plant, I can let the plant happily chug along, producing all of the … Continue reading Growing the biggest and best in the garden